Archive for October, 2013

Col Lackey Talks About The Athletic Cadre

October 31, 2013

lackey2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Col. Tony Lackey ‘61  As told to Andy Solomon

Did you ever wonder when Athletic Cadre began?

For those of you who do not know what Athletic Cadre is, it is the period when our athletes arrive to school prior to the rest of the Corps so they can learn the military aspect of The Citadel.  It is during this time when they learn how to salute, march, dress appropriately, handle their rifle and other important and related “knob knowledge,” including the absorption of The Guidon.

Yes, I was involved.

Coach Bobby Ross started his headcoaching run at The Citadel

Coach Bobby Ross started his headcoaching run at The Citadel

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bobby Ross replaced Red Parker as our head football coach and he began his tenure prior to the the 1973 season.  He and his new staff – truly one of the best staffs ever assembled, and more on that another time — recruited and brought in a lot of kids.  However, Coach Ross lost about half of them within the first two weeks of school.

Things were obviously much different then as during the knob week — when freshmen were formally introduced to the fourth-class system – as many of the football players lived as civilians.  It was how it was back then, and always had been.

The freshmen reported, got their haircuts, and those who were football players went to practice in addition to everything else their fellow knobs had to learn and endure.

Like I said, it had always been done that way and each coach dealt with it differently.  I understand that Coach John Sauer and his top aide, Al Davis, once sequestered the football team at Parris Island.

As the football TAC officer, Coach Ross came to me and asked what could be done to help with the attrition.  We discussed the situation, and I eventually presented the question to Col Walt Clark, the Commandant of Cadets.

It was then that we decided that in 1974, we’d bring the football players in early and see if we can train them without football practice and have them ready to integrate with the rest of the freshman class.

Coach Eddie Teague, a former head football coach here who was also the director of athletics, had to secure NCAA approval, which he did, and it was approved.  Of course, Coach Teague was a former marine and being an ex-coach as well, loved the concept.

So we brought them early prior to the ’74 season.  I remember that Dickie Jones of Sumter, who was the A Company 1st Sergeant and later Regimental Commander, was instrumental in getting the Cadre started.  I believe that Richard Wieters, too, was part of the first Athletic Cadre.

Most of the Cadre then was comprised primarily of athletes, as they clearly understood the situation.

Reflecting, it worked so well that it is still in operation today, although it has been tweaked over the years.

As a side note, Coach Ross once consulted with VMI about their overall athletic program and suggested they adopt the Cadre system as we have it.

They declined.

Citadel cadets at work with the British Parliament

October 30, 2013

By: Cadets Tyler Mitchell, ’15 and Nate Madden, ’14

October 27, 2013

“Oh Citadel we sing thy fame for the entire world to hear…” And so it begins. On Tuesday, October 22, 2013 we, Cadets Tyler Mitchell and Nate Madden, departed The Citadel and Charleston to represent our institution in the government of the United Kingdom. A once in a lifetime opportunity, we are excited and humbled to have such an honor bestowed on us.

Big Red at Big Ben, Cadets Tyler Mitchell and Nate Madden work with the British Parliament

Our journey began with the departure from Charleston International Airport to Charlotte-Douglas at which point we flew 7 hours to London’s Heathrow International. After making it through Customs and Border Control, we were off to our two bedrooms flat in Vincent Square. The first day of our escapade began with a search for groceries, toiletries, and redcoats. After a brief sightseeing adventure, we returned to our apartment to unpack and began settling into our new home.

The next day consisted of more sightseeing divergences. Instead of going to the local Tesco grocery store (as originally planned) we ended up visiting many monumental sights such as Parliament/Big Ben, Trafalgar Square, Westminster Abbey, London Cathedral, and Buckingham Palace. That night we attempted to videoconference into a class back in Charleston, however, due to our lack of internet and the discovery that the local coffee shop closes at 7:30 pm, we were only able to connect for a moment before the barista removed us and the rest of the caffeinated crowd.

It was not until we stood in the shadow of Parliament that we realized the scope of this great opportunity. Not only are we representing our school and ourselves, we are representing our NATION by working in one of the most historic and influential governments in the world. To say that we feel blessed is an understatement. After being told about the kind of jobs we might have in working with Parliament and various think tanks, we have remained in awe at the kind of opportunity we have been afforded.

So for our first night in London, we are relaxing in our flat on Vincent square, preparing some college-student cuisine and listening to some country music, to stave of the beginning effects of homesickness. Tomorrow should consist of more adventures around this lovely city on the Thames. Stay tuned for next week’s update!

Cheers,
Tyler and Nate

Citadel players down, but not out, after string of close losses

October 30, 2013

Citadel coach Kevin Higgins’ Bulldogs are 2-4 in the Southern Conference and 2-6 overall heading into Saturday’s home game against Samford, which is 4-0 in the SoCon and 6-2 overall. (Wade Spees/The Post and

  

By: Jeff Hartsell  The Charleston Post and Courier 

October 28, 2013

If you do the math, The Citadel’s football team has lost five games by a total of 22 points this season. A calculator reveals the average margin of those five losses is 4.4 points, or somewhere between a field goal and a touchdown. But a calculator can’t reveal the depth of frustration felt by Citadel players, which might have reached a season-high after last week’s 28-24 loss at Chattanooga.

The Bulldogs were ahead for about 53 minutes in that game, building leads of 17-7 at halftime and 24-14 in the third quarter. The Citadel held advantages in first downs, rushing yards, total yards and time of possession. The Mocs didn’t take their first lead until just 122 seconds remained in the game. But all Citadel players were left with was a 2-6 record and a box lunch for the bus trip back to Charleston.

“Our guys took it hard,” Citadel coach Kevin Higgins said Monday. “It was amazing after the game, watching our guys. A bunch of them had tears in their eyes and were upset. But that’s a good sign. It means this is real, real important to these guys.”

Coming so close so many times — the Bulldogs have lost by one to Old Dominion, by three to Charleston Southern, by four to Chattanooga and by seven each to Furman and Georgia Southern — makes it all the more painful. Only a 21-10 loss to Wofford on Sept. 7 was by more than one score.  “Nobody likes to lose, and it definitely hurts when you’re up like that and give it away at the end,” said junior defensive tackle Cam Mobley. “But we’re all just focused on finishing out the season and playing hard. We want to show people we haven’t given up.”

It’s difficult to find a common theme in the close losses, Higgins said. Two dropped punts were crucial against CSU. There were two onside kicks and a 2-point conversion that came up six inches short against ODU. Georgia Southern and Chattanooga both staged late game-winning drives against the Bulldogs’ defense.  “Every game, it’s something different,” he said. “Last week against Chattanooga, we needed to stay on the field a little longer on offense in the fourth quarter. Defensively, we allowed them to drive without coming up with a big play.”

And the Bulldogs did not come up with a turnover against Chattanooga. In their two wins this season, the Bulldogs are plus-2 in turnovers; in their six losses, they are minus-4.  “For us to win football games, we’ve got to figure out a way to get some takeaways,” Higgins said.  Turnovers might be the Bulldogs’ best hope against Samford (6-2, 4-0), which owns first place in the Southern Conference and broke into the FCS Coaches Poll this week at No. 19.

Samford quarterback Andy Summerlin threw three interceptions in his team’s 34-27 win at Wofford, including a pick-six on Samford’s first play of the game. For the season, Summerlin has seven interceptions against 17 touchdown passes, and Samford ranks fourth in the SoCon in turnover margin, with 12 giveaways and 12 takeaways.

While Samford plays for a SoCon title and playoff berth, Citadel players are reduced to playing for pride, and for each other. But that means something, Citadel players say. “We haven’t given up in any games this year, and we don’t plan on doing that anytime soon,” Mobley said. “This is a chance to show who we really are, and put those losses in the past.”  Said running back Dalton Trevino, “We’re not going to lay down and let people roll over us. We’re still competing to win games. That’s part of who you are when you come to this school.”

Col. Myron Harrington, Jr. awarded Prestigious Palmetto Medal Award

October 29, 2013

 Doug Snyder and Col. Harrington

Citadel BOV member Doug Snyder and Col. Myron Harrington

CHARLESTON, S.C., Oct. 25, 2013 − After a distinguished 30-year military career and decades of service to veterans, disabled children, and his alma mater, Colonel Myron Charles Harrington, Jr., USMC (Retired), Board of Visitors, The Citadel, was today awarded with one of the college’s highest honors. The Palmetto Medal Award was given to Harrington on Summerall Field, accompanied by applause from his colleagues, Citadel staff and cadets during the school’s Friday Corps of Cadets’ parade. The official award citation, signed by Lieutenant General W. Michael Steele, USA (Retired) and chair of The Citadel Board of Visitors (BOV), and submitted by Douglas Snyder, BOV member and former chair, exalts Harrington’s military and career accomplishments, as well as his extensive volunteer service on behalf of other veterans, children, his church and The Citadel.

A portion of the citation reads, “Harrington received the most notable awards and decorations in 1968 when he was a young captain serving in Vietnam. He led a courageous assault against a heavily fortified enemy stronghold in the Hue City Citadel during the infamous Tet Offensive. In the face of extreme personal danger, he led his Marines in overrunning the entrenched North Vietnamese. For that action, Colonel Harrington received the Navy Cross, the nation’s second highest military award for valor in combat.” During his military career, Harrington also served in Australia, England, Japan and Lebanon. He concluded his military career where it started – at The Citadel where he was professor of naval science and commander of the Naval ROTC program.

Col. Myron Harrison receives Palmetto MedalCol. Myron Harrison receives Palmeto Medal Award at The Citadel

 The document also praises Harrington’s work as the headmaster of Trident Academy in Mt. Pleasant, S.C. where he became a champion of students with learning disabilities. He received the South Carolina Independent Schools Associations highest award for educational leadership in 2002. Some of his work on behalf of other veterans included helping erect a monument in Mt. Pleasant dedicated veterans who died in combat, as well as statue of Revolutionary War hero Major General William Moultrie in White Point Gardens. He also chaired the committee that brought the Medal of Honor Convention to Charleston in 2010.

Harrington received a B.A. in history from The Citadel in 1960. He earned an M.S. in public administration from Shippensburg State College in 1980, and is a graduate of The Army War College. Harrington has served as secretary on the Citadel’s Board of Visitors since July 1, 2006.

The Palmetto Medal Award was created by the college’s Board of Visitors to recognize cadets, faculty, staff or alumni for exceptional performance that reflects great credit on the college or the state of South Carolina. The Palmetto Medal is the second highest honor bestowed by the college. The first is an honorary degree. Earlier this year, Cadets Thomas Myers Jordan Jr. and Julia Mary-Louise McCullohs and faculty member Colonel Isaac Spigner “Spike” Metts, Jr. were honored by being given the 2013 Palmetto Award Medal for distinguished leadership and service.

Bulldogs Top Georgia Southern, Wofford in Two-Day Rifle Competition

October 29, 2013

Day 1 Results

Day 2 Results

Charleston, S.C. – The Citadel rifle team earned wins over Southeastern Air Rifle Conference foes Wofford and Georgia Southern in consecutive days over the weekend as the Bulldogs fired air rifle marks of 2256 and 2250, respectively, at the Inouye Marksmanship Center.

On day one of the competition the Bulldog marksmen came out firing as two members of the team carded scores of 570 or higher. Robert Jackson led all shooters with a mark of 576 while teammate Richard Hunton recorded a 571 to earn a tie for second place overall with Wofford’s Tommy McKelvey.

Charles Yeh (565), Nathaniel Moy (544) and Michael Chen (544) rounded out the top five for the Bulldogs.

The Citadel carded a team score of 2256 to earn the victory. Wofford (2212) took second place and Georgia Southern (2201) placed third.

The women’s team scored 2227 points on Saturday with a team-high mark of 564 by Teddi Haliscak. Margaret LaRiviere (558), Ashten Byrne (555), Haley Osmer (550) and Jennifer Burch (522) also received scores for the Bulldog women.

The Citadel co-ed team posted the day’s top three air rifle scores on Sunday as Hunton took the individual crown with a 574, while Byrne and Jackson carded 570s. Yeh (561), Moy (545) and Chen (542) rounded out the top five.

The women’s team logged a team score of 2217 on Sunday. After Byrne’s team-leading 570 was Haliscak (567), LaRiviere (541), Ordway (544) and Osmer (539).

Georgia Southern finished behind The Citadel on Sunday with a team score of 2234, while Wofford took third with a total of 2227 points.

The Citadel hits the road for the next two weeks as the team is slated to go to Spartanburg, S.C., next week to compete in the fourth Southeastern Air Rifle Conference competition of the season on Saturday, before trekking to Dahlonega, Ga., for SEARC 5 on Nov. 9.

Hammond weighs options for college

October 28, 2013

 

Hammond

Is The Citadel Jauveer Hammond’s 1st choice?

 

By: JEREMY TIMMERMAN – The Aiken Standard

Thursday, October 24, 2013 11:59 p.m.

 JOHNSTON — Much like he does on the field, Strom Thurmond quarterback Jauveer Hammond will have his eye on multiple options as he makes his college decision.

With attention from Appalachian State, South Carolina State, Catawba and Lenoir-Rhyne as either a defensive back or slot receiver and as a quarterback from The Citadel, location isn’t the only factor affecting the process. For Hammond, the important part is taking the proper next step on his journey.

“Right now, I just want the best opportunity that comes to me, to get me out of here,” he said.

A defensive back during his sophomore year, Hammond has spent the last two seasons as one of the area’s top signal-callers. He earned All-Aiken Standard first-team quarterback honors last season, and he’s the area’s top dual threat again this year with more than 1,100 passing yards, 800 rushing yards and 17 total touchdowns through eight games.

Even though he has enjoyed his time at defensive back, he certainly wouldn’t mind the opportunity to continue his career behind center.  “I love both of them, but right now, my heart is at QB,” Hammond said. As a result, The Citadel would seem to have an edge with the senior at this point. Hammond said that football isn’t the only reason the Charleston military institution is among the leaders to pick up his services.  “The opportunity would mean a lot because not only playing quarterback, but it makes me a better person in the world to serve my country and do whatever it takes to make me a better person,” Hammond said.

One game that seems to be helping his cause with colleges was the team’s 27-20 loss to North Augusta on Sept. 27. Hammond ran 29 times for 134 yards and a touchdown in the defeat, and he also completed 17 of 31 passes for 231 yards and two more scores in one of the most highly-anticipated games in the area over the last several years.

That “competitive edge” to come up big when the lights were at their brightest is one of Hammond’s biggest assets, Sawyer said. “Not everybody can do what he did at North Augusta in front of that kind of crowd,” Sawyer said. The coach also said Hammond’s experience at quarterback will help, even if he ends up playing another position in college. In addition to the strategic advantages of being at the center of the action for every offensive snap, there are intangible effects. “It’s a leadership role, and he’s also obviously got to be well aware of coverages and that kind of stuff,” Sawyer said. “You’re touching the ball every time at quarterback, and he’s what makes us go.”

Hammond is preparing himself for either side of the ball, taking advantage of the football knowledge of cousin Hykeem Brooks. A former Rebel and North-South selection, Brooks is set to start play for Paine College next season. “I practice all week at school for Strom Thurmond High School at quarterback, but on the weekends I practice with my cousin Hykeem at defensive back,” Hammond said.

The senior said he hopes to make his decision soon, but whatever the situation, Sawyer said that Hammond’s rare physical abilities will make him an asset at the next level.  “There’s not but a handful of guys that we’ve ever had that can make some of the plays he’s made this year,” he said.

Mocs Score Late to Edge The Citadel in Southern Conference Contest

October 27, 2013
#22 Darien Robinson throws a block & Dalton Trevino goes 61 yards for his for his TD in the 3rd quarter

#22 Darien Robinson throws a block & Dalton Trevino goes 61 yards for his TD in the 3rd quarter

Dog’s Close, but No Cigar vs 6-2 Chattanooga

Citadelsports.com

Chattanooga, Tenn. – The Citadel rushed for 334 yards and led the game for 58 minutes, but a late fourth quarter touchdown run by Jacob Huesman put the Mocs on top for good in a 28-24 win on Saturday at Finley Stadium in Chattanooga.

The Bulldogs drop to 2-6 and 2-4 in the Southern Conference while Chattanooga improves to 6-2 with a 4-1 mark in the conference. Five of the Bulldogs’ six losses this season have been decided by seven points or less.

Following a Citadel punt, the Mocs took over at their own 21 with 3:42 left on the clock. Huesman heaved a 28-yard pass over the middle to C.J. Board, moving the ball to the Bulldogs’ 43, and three subsequent rushes up the middle by Huesman led to his 13-yard touchdown which put UTC ahead for the first time in the game with 2:02 remaining.

Chattanooga came up with two sacks of Aaron Miller on The Citadel’s final possession, which ended on an incomplete pass on fourth down.

The Citadel outgained Chattanooga 395-341 with Darien Robinson leading the rushing attack with 129 yards on 24 carries. Eight different Bulldogs had rushing attempts in the game.

The 100-yard game is the 12th of Robinson’s career and third this season. The redshirt senior passed former NFL running back Nehemiah Broughton for fifth on The Citadel’s all-time rushing list with 2,652 yards and needs 141 to overtake Andrew Johnson (1973-76).

The Citadel used over nine minutes on its opening drive of the game to move the ball 90 yards in 12 plays culminating in a 13-yard touchdown run by Ben Dupree. The Bulldogs moved the chains five times on the drive, including two third down conversions, and finished the game with 21.

The score was Dupree’s conference-leading 12th of the season and 30th of his career, and the senior quarterback is just one shy of tying Citadel all-time leading rusher Stump Mitchell for third in school history.

Dupree closed out the game with 56 yards on 12 attempts to improve his career total to 2,345 as he closes in on Maurice Murphy (2,350) for seventh place in program history in rushing yards.

After a quick three-and-out on the Mocs’ opening drive, the Bulldogs took over at midfield and converted two more first downs before the drive stalled at the UTC 6. Thomas Warren split the uprights on a 23-yard field goal to give The Citadel a 10-0 lead.

The field goal was Warren’s 15th of his career, which is good for 11th most in school history. The senior kicker added three more extra points to remain a perfect 70-for-70 in his career and moved him past Hank Burriss for the fifth most PATs made in Citadel history.

The Mocs took the ensuing drive into the second quarter and was able to get their first points of the game on a Kendrix Huitt rush over the left tackle from seven yards out to narrow The Citadel lead to 10-7.

The Bulldogs got back to work and marched right down the field with a five-minute drive that went 75 yard on nine plays. With Aaron Miller under center, the junior converted a 3rd-and-1 with his legs, followed by a 3rd-and-5 with his arm on a six-yard pass to Vinny Miller.

Two plays later Miller connected with Jake Stenson for a 41-yard touchdown to put the Bulldogs ahead 17-7. Stenson has now been the receiver for three of the Bulldogs’ four touchdowns through the air this season.

Miller finished the game 5-of-9 passing with 56 yards. The touchdown was his second of the season and third of his career.

The Bulldogs entered the half with a 267-83 edge over the Mocs in yards and accumulated 215 on the ground through the first 30 minutes. UTC’s ground game was hampered when its leading rusher, Keon Williams, left the game in the first quarter with a foot injury.

After a drive deep into Bulldogs’ territory stalled, a 42-yard punt by Eric Goins started the Mocs’ drive at The Citadel 48. UTC used eight plays in just under three minutes to get back in the end zone with a four-yard touchdown pass from Huesman to tight end Faysal Shafaat to make it a 17-14 game.

Huesman finished the game with 102 yards and two touchdowns on 9-of-19 passing.

The Bulldogs returned the favor less than two minutes later when Dalton Trevino took an outside handoff from the Bulldog 39 and ran untouched around the left end for a career-long 61-yard touchdown at the six-minute mark of the third quarter. The scamper extended the Bulldogs’ lead to 24-14 and was the longest rushing touchdown allowed this season by the conference- leading Mocs defense, which entered the game allowing just 156 yards per game on the ground.

Chattanooga found the end zone one more time in the third quarter on Huesman’s second touchdown pass, a 33-yarder to Xavier Borishade, to shrink the Bulldog lead to three points, 24-21.

Both defenses held tough and stymied the offenses through most of the fourth quarter. Carl Robinson and Rah Muhammad led The Citadel with six tackles. Muhasibi Wakeel led all tacklers with 17 for UTC while teammate D.J. Key recorded 13.

Muhammad and Nick Willis both recorded two tackles for loss apiece, including Willis’ first career sack.

Derek Douglas posted his 14th career sack in the second quarter to move him past former teammate Chris Billingslea for fifth most in program history. The tackle for loss jumps the senior captain into a tie with Michael Ballentine for seventh place with 36.5 on his career.

The Citadel returns to Charleston for homecoming next Saturday, a 2 p.m. kickoff against conference leader Samford.  Former Bulldog football player and 1960 graduate Paul Maguire will provide analysis on ESPN3 while former “Voice of the Bulldogs” Darren Goldwater will handle the play-by-play.

Coming home to The Citadel

October 25, 2013

sunsetatElCid

The Military College of S.C. welcomes alumni, families and neighbors for Homecoming 2013

CHARLESTON, S.C. – From the sounds of The Citadel Regimental Band and Pipes, to the sights of the orderly parade of 21 cadet companies, to the familiar scents of the S.C. Lowcountry – fall means coming home to one of the nation’s most historic college campuses for hundreds of visitors.

With events for alumni groups dating as far back as the class of 1954, Homecoming 2013 at The Citadel offers a busy schedule of reunions, remembering, football and fun. Official festivities begin with the Homecoming Gala Reception and Awards Dinner, Oct. 31, and conclude with a variety of worship services on Nov. 3.

As early as the class of 1886, Citadel graduates have been holding reunions on campus to celebrate their achievements and catch up with their classmates. The first homecoming football game was on Oct. 25, 1924. According to newspaper reports at the time, The Citadel played Furman in Hampton Park and graduates had a barbeque picnic on Indian Hill.

This year The Citadel Bulldogs play Samford University at 2p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 2 at Johnson Hagood Stadium. There are four days of homecoming events. A list of highlights is below.

Homecoming is one of the college’s four major weekends. The others are Parents’ Day in October, Corps Day in March and Graduation Week in May.

For more information about attending any specific Citadel Homecoming 2013 event, please contact the Office of Alumni Affairs at 953-7696.

Oct. 31

 

 

 

6p.m.

Homecoming Gala   Reception and Awards Dinner

Holliday Alumni   Center

Members only

Nov. 1

 

 

 

10a.m.

Alumni Association annual meeting and awards

Holliday Alumni   Center

Members only; Fee to attend

1-5p.m.

Game tickets on   sale

McAlister Field   House or www.etix.com

 

 

$30-$35

1:30p.m.

Ring resizing   and reordering

Holliday Alumni   Center

Citadel   graduates only

2p.m.

School of   Business Administration reception & awards

Bond Hall, Room   205

School of   Business graduates

3:30p.m.

Cadet Chorale   performs Alumni Memorial Service

Summerall   Chapel

 

5:10p.m.

Memorial Parade  

Summerall Field

 

5:45-7p.m.

Citadel Young Alumni   event for Classes of 1999-2013

Renken Room and   Courtyard; Holliday Alumni Center

Free for Alumni   from Classes of 1999-2013

7-11p.m.

Alumni Jamboree

Charleston Visitor’s   Center Bus Shed; Meeting Street

Fee to attend

Nov. 2

 

 

 

8a.m.

Annual breakfast   for past presidents of The Citadel

Holliday Alumni   Center

 

8:30-11a.m.

Alumni   Information Center & Coffee

Holliday Alumni   Center

 

8:30-10a.m.

Barracks &   facilities open to visitors; Pipe Band performances

Barracks

 

8:50a.m.

Summerall Guard   performance

Summerall Field

 

9a.m.

Sale of game   tickets

Johnson Hagood   Stadium or www.etix.com

 

$30-$35

9a.m.

Himelright   Scholarship Presentation

LeTellier Hall

 

11a.m.

Homecoming   Review of Cadets; recognition of Arland D. Williams Society inductees; 2013   CAA Honored Alumni

Summerall Field

 

Noon

Open Luncheon

Coward Hall

(Free for   cadets)

Noon

School of   Engineering Luncheon

Grimsley Hall

 

12:30p.m.

Stadium gates   open; concessions available

Johnson Hagood   Stadium

 

Noon-2p.m.

Pre-game   Tailgate Events

Holliday Alumni   Center

 

2pm

Game kick off;   The Citadel vs. Samford              

Johnson Hagood   Stadium

$30-$35

Half-time

Regimental Band   and Pipes performance

Johnson Hagood   Stadium

 

Nov. 3

 

 

 

9a.m.

Protestant service

Summerall   Chapel

 

10a.m.

Protestant   service reception

Mark Clark Hall   Reception Room

 

10:45a.m.

Catholic Mass

Summerall   Chapel

 

Noon

Catholic Mass   reception

Mark Clark Hall   Reception Room

 

Oct. 31

 

 

 

6p.m.

Homecoming Gala   Reception and Awards Dinner

Holliday Alumni   Center

Members only

Nov. 1

 

 

 

10a.m.

Alumni   Association annual meeting and awards

Holliday Alumni   Center

Members only;   Fee to attend

1-5p.m.

Game tickets on   sale

McAlister Field   House or www.etix.com

 

 

$30-$35

1:30p.m.

Ring resizing   and reordering

Holliday Alumni   Center

Citadel   graduates only

2p.m.

School of   Business Administration reception & awards

Bond Hall, Room   205

School of   Business graduates

3:30p.m.

Cadet Chorale   performs Alumni Memorial Service

Summerall   Chapel

 

5:10p.m.

Memorial Parade  

Summerall Field

 

5:45-7p.m.

Citadel Young Alumni   event for Classes of 1999-2013

Renken Room and   Courtyard; Holliday Alumni Center

Free for Alumni   from Classes of 1999-2013

7-11p.m.

Alumni Jamboree

Charleston Visitor’s   Center Bus Shed; Meeting Street

Fee to attend

Nov. 2

 

 

 

8a.m.

Annual breakfast   for past presidents of The Citadel

Holliday Alumni   Center

 

8:30-11a.m.

Alumni   Information Center & Coffee

Holliday Alumni   Center

 

8:30-10a.m.

Barracks &   facilities open to visitors; Pipe Band performances

Barracks

 

8:50a.m.

Summerall Guard   performance

Summerall Field

 

9a.m.

Sale of game   tickets

Johnson Hagood   Stadium or www.etix.com

 

$30-$35

9a.m.

Himelright   Scholarship Presentation

LeTellier Hall

 

11a.m.

Homecoming   Review of Cadets; recognition of Arland D. Williams Society inductees; 2013   CAA Honored Alumni

Summerall Field

 

Noon

Open Luncheon

Coward Hall

(Free for   cadets)

Noon

School of   Engineering Luncheon

Grimsley Hall

 

12:30p.m.

Stadium gates   open; concessions available

Johnson Hagood   Stadium

 

Noon-2p.m.

Pre-game   Tailgate Events

Holliday Alumni   Center

 

2pm

Game kick off;   The Citadel vs. Samford              

Johnson Hagood   Stadium

$30-$35

Half-time

Regimental Band   and Pipes performance

Johnson Hagood   Stadium

 

Nov. 3

 

 

 

9a.m.

Protestant service

Summerall   Chapel

 

10a.m.

Protestant   service reception

Mark Clark Hall   Reception Room

 

10:45a.m.

Catholic Mass

Summerall   Chapel

 

Noon

Catholic Mass   reception

Mark Clark Hall   Reception Room

 

 

 

Medal of Honor recipient speaks at Citadel

October 24, 2013
 
 By: Dave Munday, The Charleston Post and Courier 10.22.13

 A Medal of Honor recipient speaking at The Citadel Tuesday was asked if he would do anything differently if he could relive the day he lost his right hand to a grenade. Army 1st Sgt. Leroy Petry, who was wounded saving his Ranger buddies in Afghanistan in 2008, didn’t hesitate. “Throw with my left hand,” he said, holding up his prosthesis.

Several hundred cadets listening to him in McAlister Field House laughed, and Petry laughed too. It’s all about attitude, he said. President Barack Obama, who gave Petry the medal two years ago, noted that Petry could have retired with honors after his ordeal. Instead he re-enlisted. They won’t let him back on the front lines, but he spends his time working with wounded Rangers at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington.

When asked what one quote he would leave for posterity, he said, “Do something today to better others and yourself.”  Petry, 34, will join cadets today for service projects in local schools as part of the college’s leadership day.

Petry was wounded in both legs by Taliban forces outside a house in Afghanistan May 26, 2008. A live grenade landed near him and his fellow Rangers. He grabbed it. The grenade went off as he threw it, blowing off his hand. He tied up his wrist with a tourniquet and continued to direct his men. “His gallant act undeniably saved his fellow Rangers from being severely wounded or killed,” according to his Medal of Honor citation.

Petry is married with four children. One of his sons is in college. “The greatest pride a parent can have is knowing his child is not going to be a drain on society but is going to contribute to its success,” he told the cadets.  He said his 10-year-old son plans to go out trick-or-treating dressed in a Ranger uniform — as Sgt. Leroy Petry, Medal of Honor winner.

Col. Joseph Trez, director of the Krause Center for Leadership and Ethics, moderated a question and answer session after Petry’s talk. Bo Moore, dean of humanities and social sciences, gave Petry a Citadel ring before he was mobbed by cadets coming out of the stands.

Citadel’s Bice: 2-5 Bulldogs still have something to play for!

October 23, 2013
Cadet Devin Bice #76 for your Bulldogs

Cadet Devin Bice #76 for your Bulldogs

By: Jeff Hartsell  The Charleston Post & Courier  10/21/13

Citadel offensive tackle Devin Bice has heard the talk, not uncommon around football teams that have won only two of their first seven games.  The coaches should devote the rest of the season to getting younger players ready for next year, people say. With goals of competing for a Southern Conference championship and FCS playoff bid out the window, the final five games of the 2013 season should be about the future. Bice isn’t buying it.

“If we look at the rest of the season like it’s spring practice, or whatever people are saying, we will go downhill,” said the fifth-year senior from Bonifay, Fla. “If we keep our heads up and work hard, we can still have a winning season and still actually do something this season.  “For a lot of us, this is our last time playing football, so we want to do the best we can do.”

The Citadel (2-5, 2-3 Southern Conference) had an open date last week, a chance to rest and get a head start on preparing for Saturday’s game at Chattanooga (5-2, 3-1). It was a welcome respite for a team that had been going non-stop for about three months, since the start of preseason camp. The Bulldogs practiced three days last week before taking off Friday and Saturday, then returned to practice Sunday for the start of game week.

A lot of the players were able to get off campus. Bice, for example, went to Myrtle Beach with some teammates for “some home-cooked meals and a lot of football,” he said.  Other players got a chance to take care of delayed business. Junior safety Akeem Garnett had his wisdom teeth pulled, for example. “It was a perfect chance to get them pulled and have time to recover from that,” Garnett said.

The bye week should help the Bulldogs be rested and ready for the season’s stretch run — at Chattanooga, Samford, at Elon, VMI and at Clemson. At 2-5, The Citadel would have to win all five remaining games to post a winning record, unlikely with Clemson looming at the end of the season. But the Bulldogs could still achieve a winning mark against FCS competition and finish 5-3 in the SoCon with upsets of Chattanooga and Samford and wins over Elon and VMI.

On the other hand, if the Bulldogs lose out, they’d be the first 10-loss team in school history.  “Our focus is on our next opponent,” said coach Kevin Higgins. “We try not to get caught up with how many games you have left, how many you have to win.”

Chattanooga has won three straight since a 23-21 loss at Georgia Southern, and took a 20-9 win at Elon last week. The Mocs’ defense is tops in the SoCon in scoring defense, allowing just 16.7 points per game. Defensive end Davis Tull is second in the SoCon with 6.5 sacks and 9.5 tackles for loss. Linebacker Wes Dothard was the SoCon defensive player of the week with 13 tackles against Elon.

Chattanooga ranks last in the SoCon in red-zone defense, allowing foes to score on 17 of 17 trips inside the 20-yard line. That’s perhaps the most deceiving stat in college football, because only eight of those 17 trips have resulted in touchdowns. That TD-to-trips percentage of .470 is best in the league.  “They’ve got the best defense in the league right now,” Higgins said. “At every level, they’ve got guys who can run.”

On offense, the Mocs have two of the top nine rushers in the league in tailback Keon Williams (98.1 yards per game) and sophomore quarterback Jacob Huesman (79 ypg). Huesman, son of coach Russ Huesman, has also hit 95 of 141 passes (67.4 percent) for 950 yards and 11 touchdowns against four interceptions